Dead Man Waiting space

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Mark Pierson and I curated worship last night for Easter Saturday. It was called Dead Man Waiting.

i found working on this worship incredibly powerful. How has the church managed to give over such an enormous day to the hardware shops?

We had a spoken reflective liturgy, with plenty of space for waiting between reflections. At the end of that we had space for responsive stations, that reflected different elements in the liturgy.

i’ll put the stations below in separate posts later. These are some photos of the space. it was completely stunning. mark (who is spectacular in his attention to detail… i love working with a fellow perfectionist: most repeated line “but it matters”) experimented over and over with cones and food colouring… thanks to Warwick for the 393 photos he took… beautiful.

worship was held in the dome at the Mission to the Seafarers. It’s a large round space, with a huge dome, about 8m high. It’s really rough space.

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In the centre of the room we suspended ‘cones’ of red ice that dripped onto a massive pile of crushed ice, and larger solid blocks. the actual worship was lit with UV lights and black and white candles.

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There was probably about 120 kg crushed ice in all. it barely melted (really easy to clean up!).

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We projected onto two sides of the dome – a video loop called ‘breath’, done by one of the Urban Seeders. It’s a loop of a person breathing condensation. it looked stunning. this photo was taken from ‘underneath’ a black candle, looking up. (that warwick, he’s good…)

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and at the entrance to the room, we had a triptych projecting – a Pieta image in the middle which stayed the same, and changing images from the news this week on the side – situations of waiting from around the world.

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3 Comments

  1. craig mitchell

    sounds fantastic. wish I’d been there. can’t wait to see the photos and hear more.

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